Valerie Damen
PolyPortrait_VectorLines-01.png

Prism of Roses

Client: Internal
Services Provided: Digital Illustration

 

With careful consideration of perspective and form, I treated each portion of the face as its own entity and interlocked connecting polygons respectively.

 

Prism of Roses

Client: Internal
Services Provided: Digital Illustration

Overview

One of my favorite pastimes during my days off is experimenting with new digital techniques. The art of the Low Poly Portrait is one of many side projects that I've tackled during my free time.

Challenges

I faced three main challenges during the production of this project:

1. Abstracting the face using a series of polygons.

2. Creating dimension through two-toned gradient color swatches.

3. Patience and commitment to the time-consuming process.

Technique & Construction

After the production of creating the Faculty of Education's visual identity for the U of A, I grew very fond of geometry in design. I had the pleasure of diving deep into the world of geometric pattern development and forming custom typography/illustrations from polygonal prisms, but I had yet to craft a low poly portrait — it was on my todo list for quite some time. It wasn't until I came across a day of the dead portrait, that I decided to cross this experiment off of my todo list.

Extremely inspired by the challenge that I knew this detailed portrait would encompass, I imported the beautiful photo onto a background layer in Photoshop and began parsing the planes of the face out of a series of polygons. With careful consideration of perspective and form, I treated each portion of the face as its own entity and interlocked connecting polygons respectively.

Once the skeletal foundation was complete, I then began the color application process on another Photoshop layer. Using color swatches sampled directly from the original photo, I individually selected each polygon and filled each shape with a two-tone gradient. After hours of dedication and patience, eventually, I was left with artwork that took on illusion and realism through the artwork's abstraction and color.

Production

The portrait was printed on large-scale posters, canvas prints, magnets, and postcards.

Commissions

I do take on commisions for low poly portraits. So if you're interested in having you or someone you know transformed into a low poly portrait, email me for inquiries.